Futurology


I posted a few years ago that Facebook would become the “operating system of the Internet” and it has. I should have bought those shares!

The tools are out there now that make it easy and affordable to deploy and monitor marketing campaigns across Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest and Google+ … sites that already have the attention and engagement of our target audiences.

So why go to the trouble and expense of designing a web site and attracting people to it when they are all living somewhere else online, increasingly on the move using the apps provided by those sites.

We’re about to launch a branded campaign for a client that will live entirely in socialmedialand. No website, no email marketing, no search marketing. But blogs, competitions, messages, videos, images, comments, posts and more, across Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and LinkedIn.

If you were hunting elephants in the jungle and knew that they all congregated every day, at about 4pm at the water hole in the clearing, would you continue to struggle through the undergrowth to try and locate them at 10 in the morning? Of course not.

We do a lot of work in pharma and in financial services and they have more in common than you might imagine.

Both sectors face increasing competition and we’re working on an evidence-based approach to strategy development that works in both.

In pharma, patents are expiring at an unprecedented rate, allowing generic alternatives to flood the market wiping millions from the bottom line overnight. In banking, regulation separating retail from investment operations and the growth and encouragement of smaller and new banks is threatening the historical domination of larger organisations.

The end result for both sectors is an ever more pressing need to allocate marketing budgets more wisely and that means informing strategy with insights gained from the analysis of customer data and learning from what did and didn’t work in the past.

You’d be forgiven for assuming that global household-name businesses did this already.

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The Digital Manifesto:

The ‘new’ Internet is ubiquitous—it touches everything and is everywhere. In the G-20 countries, the Internet economy is expected to reach $4.2 trillion in 2016, up from $2.3 trillion in 2010. Over the same period, the Internet is expected to gain more than a billion new users, its reach extending to 45 percent of the world’s population. Consumers are reaping the largest benefits from the Internet economy—across the G-20, $1.3 trillion worth of goods was researched online in 2010 before being purchased offline.

The center of gravity has shifted—on a number of fronts. There are already more mobile broadband connections than fixed, for example, and they’re growing four times faster. Moreover, the Internet is becoming a mainstream shopping channel, and smartphones are increasingly being used for e-commerce. Emerging markets are at the forefront of the new Internet, driving massive growth in users—China alone is expected to add the equivalent of more than the entire U.S. Internet population in five years.

Although we are still at the beginning of realizing the potential of the Internet, far-sighted companies and countries are already taking steps to build digital advantage.

(Via bcg.perspectives.)

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